Tech: There are billions of pounds of plastic in the ocean — but scientists think this machine can clean it up


Tech There are billions of pounds of plastic in the ocean — but scientists think this machine can clean it up

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Plastic clumps and particles account for 70% of all litter in the ocean, representing billions of pounds of material that present a hazard to ocean life.

Discarded toys are seen amongst trash, on a beach near the high-income Costa del Este neighborhood in Panama City September 10, 2013.play

Discarded toys are seen amongst trash, on a beach near the high-income Costa del Este neighborhood in Panama City September 10, 2013.

(REUTERS/Carlos Jasso)
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There's a lot of plastic in the water.

Plastic clumps and particles account for 70% of all litter in the ocean, representing billions of pounds of material that present a serious hazard to ocean life.

But sifting small pieces of plastic out of the largest bodies of water on the planet is a major challenge.

Already, machines exist that can sift plastic particles out of salt water and convert them into their base hydrocarbons — the building blocks of fuel. But those machines are generally too big and unwieldy do deploy where they can be the most useful: in the oceans themselves.

A new project, presented at the most recent meeting of the American Chemical Society, aims to do just that.

James Holm (pictured) and Swaminathan Ramesh, Ph.D., teamed up to develop a mobile reactor (also pictured) to convert waste plastic into fuel.play

James Holm (pictured) and Swaminathan Ramesh, Ph.D., teamed up to develop a mobile reactor (also pictured) to convert waste plastic into fuel.

(Claudia Rocha/American Chemical Society)

Of course, though the project was created with the goal of improving the environment in mind, it has at least one built-in environmental drawback: Converting all the billions of pounds of ocean plastic into a hydrocarbon fuel, then burning that fuel, would likely add a non-trivial amount of carbon to the atmosphere.

The first major test of the reactor will take place in Santa Cruz, California, where it will convert plastics into diesel for the local government to power city vehicles. Whether similar reactors will actually be deployed out on the water in any large-scale way remains to be seen.

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Chuka (Webby) Aniemeka
Chuka (Webby) Aniemeka

Chuka is an experienced certified web developer with an extensive background in computer science and 18+ years in web design & development. His previous experience ranges from redesigning existing website to solving complex technical problems with object-oriented programming. Very experienced with Microsoft SQL Server, PHP and advanced JavaScript. He loves to travel and watch movies.

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