Nigerian Music

Our collection of music by Nigerian Artist. Upload a song or email your file. Click on a name to listen to the artist.
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List of Nigerian Musicians:: Rap | Nigeria Music | Top 100 Nigeria Music | Reggae | R n B | Pop | Hip Pop | Blues | Reggaeton | Gospel | Yoruba | HighLife | Hausa | Ibo | Efik | Edo | Onitsha | French

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Nigerian Music Pop Music?

Listen to our large collection of pop artis. Good listening time.

Nigerian Music Gospel

Presenting gospel musicians for your listening pleasure.

Nigerian Music Rap Music

Listen to famous rap artist, including 50cents, Snoop, etc.

Nigerian Music R n B Music

A collection of the latest R&B for your listening pleasure.

Listen to Fela's Music Fela Kuti

The musical style performed by Fela Kuti is called Afrobeat, which is a complex fusion of Jazz, Funk, Ghanaian/Nigerian High-life, psychedelic rock..

HighLife Music Highlife Music

Highlife is a music genre that originated in Ghana in the 20th century and spread to Sierra Leone, Nigeria and other West African countries by 1920. It is very popular in Liberia and all of English-speaking West Africa, although little has been produced in other countries due to economic challenges brought on by war and instability. Highlife is characterized by jazzy horns and multiple guitars which lead the band. Recently it has acquired an uptempo, synth-driven sound (see Daddy Lumba). Joromi is a sub-genre. This arpeggiated highlife guitar part is modeled after an Afro-Cuban guajeo. The pattern of attack-points is nearly identical to the 3-2 clave motif guajeo shown earlier in this article. The bell pattern known in Cuba as clave, is indigenous to Ghana and Nigeria, and is used in highlife. .

History of Nigerian Music

The music of Nigeria includes many kinds of Folk and popular music, some of which are known worldwide. Styles of folk music are related to the multitudes of ethnic groups in the country, each with their own techniques, instruments, and songs. Little is known about the country's music history prior to European contact, although bronze carvings dating back to the 16th and 17th centuries have been found depicting musicians and their instruments.

Nigeria has been called "the heart of African music" because of its role in the development of West African highlife and palm-wine music, which fuses native rhythms with techniques imported from the Congo for the development of several popular styles that were unique to Nigeria, like apala, fuji, jùjú, highlife, and Yo-pop. Subsequently, Nigerian musicians created their own styles of United States hip hop music and Jamaican reggae. Nigeria's musical output has achieved international acclaim not only in the fields of folk and popular music, but also Western art music written by composers such as Fela Sowande.

Polyrhythms, in which two or more separate beats are played simultaneously, are a part of much of traditional African music; Nigeria is no exception. The African hemiola style, based on the asymmetric rhythm pattern is an important rhythmic technique throughout the continent. Nigerian music also uses ostinato rhythms, in which a rhythmic pattern is repeated despite changes in metre.

Nigeria has some of the most advanced recording studio technology in Africa, and provides robust commercial opportunities for music performers. Ronnie Graham, an historian who specialises in West Africa, has attributed the success of the Nigerian music industry to the country's culture—its "thirst for aesthetic and material success and a voracious appetite for life, love and music, [and] a huge domestic market, big enough to sustain artists who sing in regional languages and experiment with indigenous styles". However, political corruption and rampant music piracy in Nigeria has hampered the industry's growth.


The 1950s, '60s and '70s

Following World War II, Nigerian music started to take on new instruments and techniques, including electric instruments imported from the United States and Europe. Rock N' roll, soul, and later funk, became very popular in Nigeria, and elements of these genres were added to jùjú by artists such as IK Dairo. Meanwhile, highlife had been slowly gaining in popularity among the Igbo people, and their unique style soon found a national audience. At the same time, apala's Haruna Ishola was becoming one of the country's biggest stars. In the early to mid 1970s, three of the biggest names in Nigerian music history were at their peak: Fela Kuti, Ebenezer Obey and King Sunny Ade, while the end of that decade saw the start of Yo-pop and Nigerian reggae.

Although popular styles such as highlife and jùjú were at the top of the Nigerian charts in the '60s, traditional music remained widespread. Traditional stars included the Hausa Dan Maraya, who was so well known that he was brought to the battlefield during the 1967 Nigerian Civil War to lift the morale of the federal troops.

Top 10 Nigerian Music

  1. Mad Over You
    Runtown
  2. Daddy Yo
    Wizkid
  3. Yolo Yolo
    Seyi Shay
  4. 24K Magic
    Bruno Mars
  5. Wehdone Sir
    Falz
  6. Ohema
    DJ Spinall Feat. Mr Eazi
  7. Romantic
    Korede Bello Feat. Tiwa Savage
  8. Mama
    Kiss Daniel
  9. Bank Alert
    P Square
  10. Starboy
    The Weeknd feat. Daft Punk




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